Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

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Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Rashmun on Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:39 pm

A useful article about what kind of food the mughals used to eat:

http://blogs.hindustantimes.com/my-daily-bread/?p=67

---
this should be of interest to Vakavaka:

Mughal cuisine evolved from central Asian blandness to Indian richness. [And a little nugget of information unknown to me: nasty, old Aurangzeb was a vegetarian! He loved fruit and hated meat.]

----
and then this:

Do remember that very few spices were used in royal Mughal kitchens. They almost never used cumin, coriander, ginger, pepper, cinnamon and cloves. Instead, cartloads of almonds, pistachios, walnuts, dried apricots, plums and raisins were brought into India along the new roads that India’s great empire builders constructed across Persia, Central Asia and north India.

The master of the kitchen brought in the choicest animals and ingredients from far domains, and no expense was spared. Fruits from Kabul, waterfowl and vegetables from Kashmir, water from the Ganga. Husain says: “Sheep, goats and fowls were maintained by the kitchen and were given special diet (sic) mixed with aromatic herbas, silver, gold, pearls, saffron marbles mixed with sugar, perfumed grass to get pleasant-smelling flesh…”

Husain tells us that sugar, saffron and lemon juice were used in almost every dish. Food was cooked in almond oil, apricot oil and lard from melted fatty tails of sheep. With the passage of time herbs like mint, coriander and dill made their appearance, and the spices we are familiar with slowly emerged in Mughal kitchens.

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by silvermani on Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:42 pm

In case you haven't already, check out this show on Netflix called "Raja, Rasoyi aur anya kahaniyan". In one of the episodes they covered some royal kingdom where details of all the ingredients purchased, recipes etc for each month were written up in a book. There were different grades of cuisine served based on the social class of the invitees - peasants, landed gentry, and the royals. Even the silverware in which the cuisine was served used to be different for each social class.
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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Rashmun on Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:48 pm

silvermani wrote:In case you haven't already, check out this show on Netflix called "Raja, Rasoyi aur anya kahaniyan". In one of the episodes they covered some royal kingdom where details of all the ingredients purchased, recipes etc for each month were written up in a book. There were different grades of cuisine served based on the social class of the invitees - peasants, landed gentry, and the royals. Even the silverware in which the cuisine was served used to be different for each social class.

thanks.

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Rashmun on Mon Jan 09, 2017 11:43 pm

Rashmun wrote:A useful article about what kind of food the mughals used to eat:

http://blogs.hindustantimes.com/my-daily-bread/?p=67

---
this should be of interest to Vakavaka:

Mughal cuisine evolved from central Asian blandness to Indian richness. [And a little nugget of information unknown to me: nasty, old Aurangzeb was a vegetarian! He loved fruit and hated meat.]

----
and then this:

Do remember that very few spices were used in royal Mughal kitchens. They almost never used cumin, coriander, ginger, pepper, cinnamon and cloves. Instead, cartloads of almonds, pistachios, walnuts, dried apricots, plums and raisins were brought into India along the new roads that India’s great empire builders constructed across Persia, Central Asia and north India.

The master of the kitchen brought in the choicest animals and ingredients from far domains, and no expense was spared. Fruits from Kabul, waterfowl and vegetables from Kashmir, water from the Ganga. Husain says: “Sheep, goats and fowls were maintained by the kitchen and were given special diet (sic) mixed with aromatic herbas, silver, gold, pearls, saffron marbles mixed with sugar, perfumed grass to get pleasant-smelling flesh…”

Husain tells us that sugar, saffron and lemon juice were used in almost every dish. Food was cooked in almond oil, apricot oil and lard from melted fatty tails of sheep. With the passage of time herbs like mint, coriander and dill made their appearance, and the spices we are familiar with slowly emerged in Mughal kitchens.

The Hindustan Times article (based on reviewing the book) says the mughal kitchens would 'almost never use' spices like ginger, cinnamon, cumin, etc. Now do one thing. Go here: http://persian.packhum.org/persian/main?url=pf%3Fauth%3D7%26work%3D002

The link will take u to the online version of Abul Fazl's book Ain-i-Akbari. Abul Fazl was a courtier at Akbar's court and a very close confidante of the emperor. Click on Volume 1, and then go to the chapters 'The Imperial Kitchen' and 'Recipes for Dishes' and the next chapter called 'Of Bread'. (There is also a separate chapter called 'The Fruitery' which deals with the fruits that were being consumed by the mughals.)

The 'Recipes for Dishes' chapter contains these words (i am bolding just a few of the spice names):

There are many dishes, but the description is difficult. I shall give some particulars. Cooked victuals may be arranged under three heads, first, such in which no meat is used, called now-a-days çúfiyánah; secondly, such in which meat and rice, &c., are used; thirdly, meats with spices. I shall give ten recipes of each kind.

First, 1. Zard birinj. 10 s. of rice; 5 s. of sugarcandy; 3½ s. of g'hí; raisins, almonds, and pistachios, ½ s. of each; ¼ s. of salt; 1/8; s. of fresh ginger; 1½ dáms saffron, 2½ misqáls of cinnamon. This will make four ordinary dishes. Some make this dish with fewer spices, and even without any: and instead of without meat and sweets, they prepare it also with meat and salt. 2. Khushkah. 10 s. rice; ½ s. salt; but it is made in different ways. This will likewise give four dishes. One maund of Déwzírah paddy yields 25 s. of rice, of which 17 sérs make a full pot; jinjin rice yields 22 sérs. 3. K'hichri. Rice, split dal, and g'hí 5 s. of each; 1/3 s. salt: this gives seven dishes. 4. Shírbirinj. 10 s., milk; 1 s. rice; 1 s. sugarcandy; 1 d. salt: this gives five full dishes. 5. T'húlí. 10 s. of wheat ground, of which one-third will be lost; half of that quantity of g'hí; 10 misqáls of pepper; 4 m. cinnamon; 3½ m. cloves and cardamums; 1/3 s. salt; some add milk and sweetmeats: this gives four dishes. 6. Chik'hí. 10 s. of wheat-flour, made into a paste, and washed till it is reduced to 2 s. fine paste. This is mixed with spices, and dressed with various kinds of meat. 1 s. g'hí; 1 s. onions; saffron, cardamums, and cloves, ½ d. of each; cinnamon, round pepper, and coriander seed, 1 d. of each; fresh ginger, salt 3 d. of each: this gives two dishes; some add lime juice. 7. Bádinján. 10 s. rice; 1½ s. g'hí; 3¾ s. onions; ¼ s. ginger and lime juice; pepper and coriander seed, 5 m. of each; cloves, cardamums, and assafœtida, each ½ m. This gives six dishes. 8. Pahit. For ten sérs of dál, or vetches, or gram, or skinned lentils, &c., take 2½ s. g'hí; ½ s. of salt and fresh ginger; 2 m. cuminseed; 1½ m. assafœtida: this yields fifteen dishes. It is mostly eaten with Khushkah. 9. Ság. It is made of spinach, and other greens, and is one of the most pleasant dishes. 10 s. spinach, fennel, &c., 1½ s. g'hí; 1 s. onions; ½ s. fresh ginger; 5½ m. of pepper; ½ m. of cardamums and cloves: this gives six dishes. 10. Halwá. Flour, sugarcandy, g'hí, 10 s. of each, which will give fifteen dishes; it is eaten in various ways.

There are also various kinds of sugared fruits, and drinks, which I cannot here describe.

Secondly, 1. Qabúlí. 10 s. rice; 7 s. meat; 3½ s. g'hí; 1 s. gram skinned; 2 s. onions; ½ s. salt; ¼ s. fresh ginger; cinnamon, round pepper, cuminseed, of each 1 d.; cardamums and cloves, ½ d. of each; some add almonds and raisins: this gives five dishes. 2. Duzdbiryán. 10 s. rice, 3½ s. g'hí; 10 s. meat; ½ s. salt: this gives five dishes. 3. Qímah Paláo. Rice and meat as in the preceding; 4 s. g'hí; 1 s. peeled gram; 2 s. onions; ½ s. salt; ¼ s. fresh ginger, and pepper; cuminseed, cardamums and cloves, 1 d. of each: this gives five dishes. 4. Shullah. 10 s. meat, 3½ s. rice; 2 s. g'hí; 1 s. gram: 2 s. onions; ½ s. salt, ¼ s. fresh ginger; 2 d. garlic, and round pepper, cinnamon, cardamums, cloves, 1 d., of each: this gives six dishes. 5. Bughrá. 10 s. meat; 3 s. flour; 1½ s. g'hí, 1 s. gram; 1½ s. vinegar; 1 s. sugarcandy; onions, carrots, beets, turnips, spinach, fennel, ginger, ¼ s. of each; saffron, cloves, cardamums, cuminseed, 1 d. of each; 2 d. cinnamon; 8 m. round pepper: this gives twelve dishes. 6. Qímah Shúrbá. 10 s. meat; 1 s. rice; 1 s. g'hí; ½ s. gram, and the rest as in the Shullah: this gives ten full dishes. 7. Harísah. 10 s. meat; 5 s. crushed wheat; 2 s. g'hí; ½ s. salt; 2 d. cinnamon: this gives five dishes. 8. Kashk. 10 s. meat; 5 s. crushed wheat; 3 s. g'hí; 1 s. gram; ¼ s. salt; 1½ s. onions; ½ s. ginger; 1 d. cinnamon; saffron, cloves, cardamums, cuminseed, 2 m. of each: this gives five dishes. 9. Halím. The meat, wheat, gram, spices, and saffron, as in the preceding; 1 s. g'hí; turnips, carrots, spinach, fennel, ¼ s. of each: this gives ten dishes. 10. Quṭáb, which the people of Hindústán call sanbúsah. This is made several ways. 10 s. meat; 4 s. flour; 2 s. g'hí; 1 s. onions; ¼ s. fresh ginger; ½ s. salt; 2 d. pepper and coriander seed; cardamum, cuminseed, cloves, 1 d. of each; ¼ s. of summáq. This can be cooked in twenty different ways, and gives four full dishes.

Thirdly, 1. Biryán. For a whole Dashmandí sheep, take 2 s. salt; 1 s. g'hí; 2 m. saffron, cloves, pepper, cuminseed: it is made in various ways. 2. Yakhní. For 10 s. meat, take 1 s. onions, and ½ s. salt. 8. Yulmah. A sheep is scalded in water till all the hair comes off; it is then prepared like yakhní, or any other way; but a lamb, or a kid, is more preferable. 4. Kabáb is of various kinds. 10 s. meat; ½ s. g'hí; salt, fresh ginger, onions, ¼ s. of each; cuminseed, coriander seed, pepper, cardamums cloves, 1½ d. of each. 5. Musamman. They take all the bones out of a fowl through the neck, the fowl remaining whole, ½ s. minced meat, ½ s. g'hí; 5 eggs; ¼ s. onions; 10 m. coriander; 10 m. fresh ginger; 5 m. salt; 3 m. round pepper; ½ m. saffron; it is prepared as the preceding. 6. Dupiyázah. 10 s. meat, middling fat; 2 s. g'hí; 2 s. onions; ¼ s. salt; 1/8; s. fresh pepper; cuminseed, coriander seed, cardamums, cloves, 1 d. of each; 2 d. pepper: this will give five dishes. 7. Mutanjanah sheep. 10 s. meat, middling fat; 2 s. g'hí; ½ s. gram; ¼ s. ginger; 1 d. cuminseed; round pepper, cloves, cardamums, corian­der seed 2 d. of each; this will give seven dishes full. It is also made of fowl and fish. 8. Dampukht. 10 s. meat; 2 s. g'hí; 1 s. onions; 11 m. fresh ginger; 10 m. pepper; 2 d. cloves; 2 d. cardamums. 9. Qalyah. 10 s. meat; 2 s. g'hí; 1 s. onions; 2 d. pepper; cloves, cardamums, 1 d. each; 1/8; s. salt: this will give eight dishes. In preparing qalyah, the meat is minced, and the gravy rather thick, in opposition to the mutanjanah. Here in Hindustan they prepare it in various ways. 10. Malghúbah 10 s. meat; 10 s. curds; 1 s. g'hí; 1 s. onions, ¼ s. ginger; 5 d. cloves: this will give ten dishes.


Last edited by Rashmun on Mon Jan 09, 2017 11:45 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Rashmun on Mon Jan 09, 2017 11:44 pm

the one thing that is missing, if you notice, is the absence of chill. The Mughals would not eat chili because up till then chill was unknown in India.

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by ashdoc on Tue Jan 10, 2017 8:56 am

what is the purpose of this thread ?

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Rashmun on Tue Jan 10, 2017 9:50 am

ashdoc wrote:what is the purpose of this thread ?

discussing certain aspects of the history of indian food.

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Propagandhi711 on Tue Jan 10, 2017 10:11 am

useful to only those that masturbate to images of bearded mullahs...

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

Post by Rashmun on Tue Jan 10, 2017 10:28 am

Propagandhi711 wrote:useful to only those that masturbate to images of bearded mullahs...

Props, its time to stop doing ulti all over yourself. try and develop some intellectual curiosity.

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Re: Lunch with Akbar, dinner with Jahangir (but not with Aurangzeb)

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