Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

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Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Rashmun on Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:13 am

Since the 19th century, when the similarity between Lithuanian and Sanskrit was discovered, Lithuanians have taken a particular pride in their mother tongue as the oldest living Indo-European language. To this day, to some Lithuanians their understanding of their nationality is based on their linguistic identity. It is no surprise then that they proudly quote the French linguist Antoine Meillet, who said, that anyone who wanted to hear old Indo-European should go and listen to a Lithuanian farmer. The 19th century maxim - the older the language the better - is still alive in Lithuania.

It is a common belief that there is a close similarity between the Lithuanian and Sanskrit languages; Lithuanian being the European language grammatically closest to Sanskrit. It is not difficult to imagine the surprise of the scholarly world when they learned that even in their time somewhere on the Nemunas River lived a people who spoke a language as archaic in many of its forms as Sanskrit itself. Although it was not exactly true that a professor of Sanskrit could talk to Lithuanian farmers in their language, coincidences between these two languages are truly amazing, for example:

SON: Sanskrit sunus - Lithuanian sunus

SHEEP: Sanskrit avis - Lithuanian avis

SOLE: Sanskrit padas - Lithuanian padas

MAN: Sanskrit viras - Lithuanian vyras

SMOKE: Sanskrit dhumas - Lithuanian dumas

These Lihuanian words have not changed their forms for the last five thousand years.

The relationship between Sanskrit and Lithuanian goes even deeper. Take, for example, the Lithuanian word 'daina' that usually is translated as 'song'. The word actually comes from an Indo-European root, meaning ‘to think, to remember, to ponder over’. This root is found in Sanskrit as dhi and dhya. The word also occurs in the Rigveda (ancient Indian sacred collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns) in the sense of ‘speech reflecting the inner thoughts of man’.

Apart from its Indo-European background as word and term, the ‘daina’ incorporates the idea of the Sun-Goddess who was married to the Moon-God, reminiscent of goddess Surya in the Rigveda.


http://vilnews.com/2011-04-incredible-indian-lithuanian-relations-2

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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Rashmun on Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:15 am

I just discovered that ‘back in the day’, Vedic culture existed even in – hold your breath.. Lithuania. I had to look up where Lithuania was to derive some meaning out of this finding. It is a tiny country (about half the size of Tamil-Nadu), situated all the way near the Baltic sea and having fewer people than Pune does....

Linguistic connection with Sanskrit

Amongst the European languages, apparently Lithuanian is closest in grammar to Sanskrit. There is a team of scholars at JNU in Delhi studying the connection between Sanskrit and Lithuanian.

Here are a few striking observations :

The word..

for Son: Sanskrit sunus – Lithuanian sunus
for Sheep: Sanskrit avis – Lithuanian avis
for Sole: Sanskrit padas – Lithuanian padas
for Man: Sanskrit viras – Lithuanian vyras
for Smoke: Sanskrit dhumas – Lithuanian dumas
A detailed study on these similarities is here

Prof. Sisirkumar Mitra, a prodigious scholar who made a deep study of the ancient world referred to a work called Priesistoririe Lietuva, by a Lithuanian archaeologist Pulk Tarasenka, which uncovered the following records from ancient Lithuania.

River names :

Nemuna (Yamuna), Tapti (Tapti), Narbudey (Narmada), Srobati (Saraswati)

Tribal or Clan names of the Lithuanians :

Kuru, Puru, Yadav, Sudav

Gods or Deities

Indra, Varuna, Purakanya (Vedic Parjanya)



Remarkable, no?


http://www.aryaputr.com/indian-influence-on-ancient-lithuania/

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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Rashmun on Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:21 am

Darius Razgaitis • 4 years ago
I've always been amazed by one word that is the same in Lithuanian and Hindi. It's the word for DREAM. In Lithuanian, it's SAPNAS. In Hindi: SAPNA.

Remarkable.

James Robinson Cooper • 2 years ago
The Sanskrit word for dream is Svapna.

elinarrd   • 9 months ago
In Latvian it is Sapnis (singular).

•Reply•Share ›


http://www.aryaputr.com/indian-influence-on-ancient-lithuania/

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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by MaxEntropy_Man on Sun Jul 30, 2017 6:20 am

I await some other worldly and twisted explanation of how this came to be from Seva Lamberdar.
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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:59 am

MaxEntropy_Man wrote:I await some other worldly and twisted explanation of how this came to be from Seva Lamberdar.

As Rashmun's reference / post in the above stated "These Lihuanian words have not changed their forms for the last five thousand years.", that means the Sanskrit speaking and Veda knowing brahmins left India at least 5000 yrs. ago (may be earlier) spreading their knowledge of Vedas and Sanskrit in other places (including Lithuania). This naturally agrees quite well with what I wrote as the following quite a while ago in one of my blogs,

"Yajurveda in Sanskrit means “the sacrificial Veda” or the Veda dedicated specifically to yajnas (including sacrifices and offerings). Yajurveda thus has the same type of emphasis in relation to offerings and sacrifices during worship as does Avesta (which in Sanskrit means “the offering to the deity”). This indicates that the timeline and connection involving Avesta and Vedas (including the influence of Vedas and Sanskrit on Avesta and Avestan) is Yajurvedic rather than Rigvedic, because Yajurveda came after and evolved from the older and more general Rigveda to concentrate on yajnas (including sacrifices and offerings). Thus it is clear that the influence of Vedas and Sanskrit spread outwards from India, perhaps when some Sanskrit speaking Yajurvedi brahmins in India, specializing in the Yajurveda, ended up going abroad (Persia and beyond)" ("About The Origins Of Vedas And Sanskrit (Including Aryan Invasion Theory)" --- http://creative.sulekha.com/about-the-origins-of-vedas-and-sanskrit-including-aryan-invasion-theory_591513_blog)


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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Rashmun on Tue Aug 01, 2017 2:31 am

Seva Lamberdar wrote:
MaxEntropy_Man wrote:I await some other worldly and twisted explanation of how this came to be from Seva Lamberdar.

As Rashmun's reference / post in the above stated "These Lihuanian words have not changed their forms for the last five thousand years.", that means the Sanskrit speaking and Veda knowing brahmins left India at least 5000 yrs. ago (may be earlier) spreading their knowledge of Vedas and Sanskrit in other places (including Lithuania). This naturally agrees quite well with what I wrote as the following quite a while ago in one of my blogs,

"Yajurveda in Sanskrit means “the sacrificial Veda” or the Veda dedicated specifically to yajnas (including sacrifices and offerings). Yajurveda thus has the same type of emphasis in relation to offerings and sacrifices during worship as does Avesta (which in Sanskrit means “the offering to the deity”). This indicates that the timeline and connection involving Avesta and Vedas  (including the influence of Vedas and Sanskrit on Avesta and Avestan) is Yajurvedic rather than Rigvedic, because Yajurveda came after and evolved from the older and more general Rigveda to concentrate on yajnas (including sacrifices and offerings). Thus it is clear that the influence of Vedas and Sanskrit spread outwards from India, perhaps when some Sanskrit speaking Yajurvedi brahmins in India, specializing in the Yajurveda, ended up going abroad (Persia and beyond)"   ("About The Origins Of Vedas And Sanskrit (Including Aryan Invasion Theory)" --- http://creative.sulekha.com/about-the-origins-of-vedas-and-sanskrit-including-aryan-invasion-theory_591513_blog)



These are wild speculations with no basis on facts. The claim that "Sanskrit speaking and Veda knowing brahmins" had left India more than 5,000 years ago for Lithuania would have had some basis if the brahmin immigrants to Lithuania had left behind their own variant of the Vedas for posterity.

This is a classic example of "If the theory does not match the facts, change the facts".

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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:06 am

Rashmun wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:
MaxEntropy_Man wrote:I await some other worldly and twisted explanation of how this came to be from Seva Lamberdar.

As Rashmun's reference / post in the above stated "These Lihuanian words have not changed their forms for the last five thousand years.", that means the Sanskrit speaking and Veda knowing brahmins left India at least 5000 yrs. ago (may be earlier) spreading their knowledge of Vedas and Sanskrit in other places (including Lithuania). This naturally agrees quite well with what I wrote as the following quite a while ago in one of my blogs,

"Yajurveda in Sanskrit means “the sacrificial Veda” or the Veda dedicated specifically to yajnas (including sacrifices and offerings). Yajurveda thus has the same type of emphasis in relation to offerings and sacrifices during worship as does Avesta (which in Sanskrit means “the offering to the deity”). This indicates that the timeline and connection involving Avesta and Vedas  (including the influence of Vedas and Sanskrit on Avesta and Avestan) is Yajurvedic rather than Rigvedic, because Yajurveda came after and evolved from the older and more general Rigveda to concentrate on yajnas (including sacrifices and offerings). Thus it is clear that the influence of Vedas and Sanskrit spread outwards from India, perhaps when some Sanskrit speaking Yajurvedi brahmins in India, specializing in the Yajurveda, ended up going abroad (Persia and beyond)"   ("About The Origins Of Vedas And Sanskrit (Including Aryan Invasion Theory)" --- http://creative.sulekha.com/about-the-origins-of-vedas-and-sanskrit-including-aryan-invasion-theory_591513_blog)



These are wild speculations with no basis on facts. The claim that "Sanskrit speaking and Veda knowing brahmins" had left India more than 5,000 years ago for Lithuania would have had some basis if the brahmin immigrants to Lithuania had left behind their own variant of the Vedas for posterity.  

This is a classic example of "If the theory does not match the facts, change the facts".
Yeah right! Read the full article I cited. You have no facts other than dreaming like some others.
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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Rashmun on Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:44 pm

Seva Lamberdar wrote:
Yeah right! Read the full article I cited. You have no facts other than dreaming like some others.

some relevant facts have been given here:

http://such.forumotion.com/t43021-how-genetics-is-settling-the-aryan-migration-debate#241171

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Re: Synthesis: Sanskrit and Lithuanian

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:05 pm

Rashmun wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:
Yeah right! Read the full article I cited. You have no facts other than dreaming like some others.

some relevant facts have been given here:

http://such.forumotion.com/t43021-how-genetics-is-settling-the-aryan-migration-debate#241171
genetics is "useful" in deciding the aryan migration (to India) debate if you overlook the serious shortcomings in genetic tests and the spurious Out-of-Africa model for human evolution, otherwise not .... 
http://such.forumotion.com/t19332-genetic-testing-issues-in-the-study-of-ancient-population-migrations-in-india-includes-info-about-the-out-of-africa-theory
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