Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by FluteHolder on Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:58 pm


FluteHolder

Posts : 2100
Join date : 2011-06-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Shyam Sundar on Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:21 pm

I watched the video.

But what exactly is the Shiva Linga?

Why do Hindus worship it?

Shyam Sundar

Posts : 48
Join date : 2017-02-25

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by FluteHolder on Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:35 pm


FluteHolder

Posts : 2100
Join date : 2011-06-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by FluteHolder on Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:48 pm


FluteHolder

Posts : 2100
Join date : 2011-06-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by FluteHolder on Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:52 pm


FluteHolder

Posts : 2100
Join date : 2011-06-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by FluteHolder on Sat Jun 24, 2017 3:00 pm


FluteHolder

Posts : 2100
Join date : 2011-06-03

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:44 pm

".... solid ling or linga (symbol, image) representing sacrificial fire during the worship of Agni was created originally as a duplicate of yajna flame. The ling or Shiv-ling made the worship of Agni (Shiv or Shiva) possible anywhere anytime by using it in place of live fire and pouring oblations over it. The tradition of smearing the Shiv-ling with ash indicates that it has close ties to fire (Agni) worship. When the Shiv-ling is placed under a pitcher (containing libation) from which the liquid slowly and continuously drips over it, there is a semblance of celebration of an uninterrupted yajna even when there is no worshipper present. Solid ling (or Shiv-ling) in that case represents the live fire (in yajna) and the pitcher (with dripping libation) symbolizes the worshipper pouring oblations into the fire. It is a simulation of the Vedic yajna even without lighting a fire; and it involves basically the worship of a ling (Shiv-ling) representing the deity Agni (as related to a yajna). This substitution of the solid image (ling) for a real flame long ago transformed various rituals and worships making them quite simple and easy. Moreover, it is clear that fire -- in actual form (as a flame) or symbolically (as a ling or image of flame) -- has been an integral part of Vedic (Hindu) yajnas (worships) for a long time whether or not the service is dedicated to Agni." ... Shiv ling and the agni worship --
http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/agni.html
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by smArtha on Wed Jun 28, 2017 4:02 pm

Seva Lamberdar wrote: ".... solid ling or linga (symbol, image) representing sacrificial fire during the worship of Agni was created originally as a duplicate of yajna flame. The ling or Shiv-ling made the worship of Agni (Shiv or Shiva) possible anywhere anytime by using it in place of live fire and pouring oblations over it. The tradition of smearing the Shiv-ling with ash indicates that it has close ties to fire (Agni) worship. When the Shiv-ling is placed under a pitcher (containing libation) from which the liquid slowly and continuously drips over it, there is a semblance of celebration of an uninterrupted yajna even when there is no worshipper present. Solid ling (or Shiv-ling) in that case represents the live fire (in yajna) and the pitcher (with dripping libation) symbolizes the worshipper pouring oblations into the fire. It is a simulation of the Vedic yajna even without lighting a fire; and it involves basically the worship of a ling (Shiv-ling) representing the deity Agni (as related to a yajna). This substitution of the solid image (ling) for a real flame long ago transformed various rituals and worships making them quite simple and easy. Moreover, it is clear that fire -- in actual form (as a flame) or symbolically (as a ling or image of flame) -- has been an integral part of Vedic (Hindu) yajnas (worships) for a long time whether or not the service is dedicated to Agni."  ... Shiv ling and the agni worship --
http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/agni.html

It reads interesting but has no basis in tradition/scriptures beyond your fertile imagination. Linga by etymology just means a (representative) symbol in Samskrit. By derivation it also has a meaning of phallus (phallus is a representative symbol of creation, potency and male gender). The oblations to Linga are referred to as 'dravya' and those to fire in Yajna are referred to as 'samidha or ahuti'. Also only Lingas consecrated to accentuate/purify Fire element (manipUraka chakra) have anything to do with Fire. But Lingas can also be consecrated to accentuate/purify other elements viz. Prithvi (Earth - moolAdhAra), Apa (Water- svAdhistAna), vAyu (Air - anAhata) and AkASa(Space - visuddhi). Or even some combination of these. A few Lingas were consecrated with Energy system manifesting to address all the Elements and Chakras.

smArtha

Posts : 1197
Join date : 2013-07-29

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Wed Jun 28, 2017 4:15 pm

smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote: ".... solid ling or linga (symbol, image) representing sacrificial fire during the worship of Agni was created originally as a duplicate of yajna flame. The ling or Shiv-ling made the worship of Agni (Shiv or Shiva) possible anywhere anytime by using it in place of live fire and pouring oblations over it. The tradition of smearing the Shiv-ling with ash indicates that it has close ties to fire (Agni) worship. When the Shiv-ling is placed under a pitcher (containing libation) from which the liquid slowly and continuously drips over it, there is a semblance of celebration of an uninterrupted yajna even when there is no worshipper present. Solid ling (or Shiv-ling) in that case represents the live fire (in yajna) and the pitcher (with dripping libation) symbolizes the worshipper pouring oblations into the fire. It is a simulation of the Vedic yajna even without lighting a fire; and it involves basically the worship of a ling (Shiv-ling) representing the deity Agni (as related to a yajna). This substitution of the solid image (ling) for a real flame long ago transformed various rituals and worships making them quite simple and easy. Moreover, it is clear that fire -- in actual form (as a flame) or symbolically (as a ling or image of flame) -- has been an integral part of Vedic (Hindu) yajnas (worships) for a long time whether or not the service is dedicated to Agni."  ... Shiv ling and the agni worship --
http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/agni.html

It reads interesting but has no basis in tradition/scriptures beyond your fertile imagination. Linga by etymology just means a (representative) symbol in Samskrit. By derivation it also has a meaning of phallus (phallus is a representative symbol of creation, potency and male gender). The oblations to Linga are referred to as 'dravya' and those to fire in Yajna are referred to as 'samidha or ahuti'. Also only Lingas consecrated to accentuate/purify Fire element (manipUraka chakra) have anything to do with Fire. But Lingas can also be consecrated to accentuate/purify other elements viz. Prithvi (Earth - moolAdhAra), Apa (Water- svAdhistAna), vAyu (Air - anAhata) and AkASa(Space - visuddhi). Or even some combination of these. A few Lingas were consecrated with Energy system manifesting to address all the Elements and Chakras.
The origin of phallus for linga is much later, after linga as a symbol had been in use in Sanskrit for a long time. None of the original / authentic religious texts (Srutis) refer to linga as phallus, but they do use it only in the sense of sign or symbol.  Using linga as phallus in Shiva linga is the same type of nonsense that goes into thinking that the word Hindu originated when someone called Sindhu as Hindu.
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Vakavaka Pakapaka on Wed Jun 28, 2017 4:16 pm

Seva Lamberdar wrote: ".... solid ling or linga (symbol, image) representing sacrificial fire during the worship of Agni was created originally as a duplicate of yajna flame. The ling or Shiv-ling made the worship of Agni (Shiv or Shiva) possible anywhere anytime by using it in place of live fire and pouring oblations over it. The tradition of smearing the Shiv-ling with ash indicates that it has close ties to fire (Agni) worship. When the Shiv-ling is placed under a pitcher (containing libation) from which the liquid slowly and continuously drips over it, there is a semblance of celebration of an uninterrupted yajna even when there is no worshipper present. Solid ling (or Shiv-ling) in that case represents the live fire (in yajna) and the pitcher (with dripping libation) symbolizes the worshipper pouring oblations into the fire. It is a simulation of the Vedic yajna even without lighting a fire; and it involves basically the worship of a ling (Shiv-ling) representing the deity Agni (as related to a yajna). This substitution of the solid image (ling) for a real flame long ago transformed various rituals and worships making them quite simple and easy. Moreover, it is clear that fire -- in actual form (as a flame) or symbolically (as a ling or image of flame) -- has been an integral part of Vedic (Hindu) yajnas (worships) for a long time whether or not the service is dedicated to Agni."  ... Shiv ling and the agni worship --
http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/agni.html
Rudra was described in an equivalent way to Agni in some verses. But then, Agni was variedly described as Varuna, Vayu, etc. In Chamakam, Agni, Varuna, etc., are described as Indra....... These are all metaphorical representations. Since Rudra is associated with sukshma sareeras (once the physical forms are all burnt off), the association with aspects of Agni is logical. In dahana samskaras, after cremation, some of the verses are dedicated to guiding the sukshma sareeras towards Rudraloka. 

Agni accepts things in the form of samidhas. We also use Agni as a medium to offer to other Gods (Indra, Varuna, etc.). In fact, our offers are "purified" when offered through Agni to any God (only then can they reach them). So, in Rg Veda, Agni  had more emphasis than anyone else.

Agni and Rudra are not the same. If Rudra is Agni, so are Varuna, Vayu, Indra, etc., etc.

Vakavaka Pakapaka

Posts : 6980
Join date : 2012-08-24

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Wed Jun 28, 2017 4:25 pm

Vakavaka Pakapaka wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote: ".... solid ling or linga (symbol, image) representing sacrificial fire during the worship of Agni was created originally as a duplicate of yajna flame. The ling or Shiv-ling made the worship of Agni (Shiv or Shiva) possible anywhere anytime by using it in place of live fire and pouring oblations over it. The tradition of smearing the Shiv-ling with ash indicates that it has close ties to fire (Agni) worship. When the Shiv-ling is placed under a pitcher (containing libation) from which the liquid slowly and continuously drips over it, there is a semblance of celebration of an uninterrupted yajna even when there is no worshipper present. Solid ling (or Shiv-ling) in that case represents the live fire (in yajna) and the pitcher (with dripping libation) symbolizes the worshipper pouring oblations into the fire. It is a simulation of the Vedic yajna even without lighting a fire; and it involves basically the worship of a ling (Shiv-ling) representing the deity Agni (as related to a yajna). This substitution of the solid image (ling) for a real flame long ago transformed various rituals and worships making them quite simple and easy. Moreover, it is clear that fire -- in actual form (as a flame) or symbolically (as a ling or image of flame) -- has been an integral part of Vedic (Hindu) yajnas (worships) for a long time whether or not the service is dedicated to Agni."  ... Shiv ling and the agni worship --
http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/agni.html
Rudra was described in an equivalent way to Agni in some verses. But then, Agni was variedly described as Varuna, Vayu, etc. In Chamakam, Agni, Varuna, etc., are described as Indra....... These are all metaphorical representations. Since Rudra is associated with sukshma sareeras (once the physical forms are all burnt off), the association with aspects of Agni is logical. In dahana samskaras, after cremation, some of the verses are dedicated to guiding the sukshma sareeras towards Rudraloka. 

Agni accepts things in the form of samidhas. We also use Agni as a medium to offer to other Gods (Indra, Varuna, etc.). In fact, our offers are "purified" when offered through Agni to any God (only then can they reach them). So, in Rg Veda, Agni  had more emphasis than anyone else.

Agni and Rudra are not the same. If Rudra is Agni, so are Varuna, Vayu, Indra, etc., etc.
I didn't say Rudra is Agni. Shankra (one of Rudras) is similar to Agni in destructive powers, but lacking Agni's (thus Shiva's) power to create.  btw, that is the reason some people use the names Shankra (a Rudra) and Shiva (originally Agni)  interchangeably, but that should be understood only with respect to destruction (their destructive powers only) and not creation.
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by smArtha on Wed Jun 28, 2017 5:07 pm

Seva Lamberdar wrote:

I didn't say Rudra is Agni. Shankra (one of Rudras) is similar to Agni in destructive powers, but lacking Agni's (thus Shiva's) power to create.  btw, that is the reason some people use the names Shankra (a Rudra) and Shiva (originally Agni)  interchangeably, but that should be understood only with respect to destruction (their destructive powers only) and not creation.

Rudra - One who Roars (with destructive anger) has more to do with Agni (and also the Agni nEtra - Third Eye) than Shankara or Shiva. Do you even care to look at the basic etymological meaning of words before you imagine and comment on these issues? FYI, these days the thesaurus and dictionaries are also available online.

smArtha

Posts : 1197
Join date : 2013-07-29

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Wed Jun 28, 2017 9:04 pm

smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:

I didn't say Rudra is Agni. Shankra (one of Rudras) is similar to Agni in destructive powers, but lacking Agni's (thus Shiva's) power to create.  btw, that is the reason some people use the names Shankra (a Rudra) and Shiva (originally Agni)  interchangeably, but that should be understood only with respect to destruction (their destructive powers only) and not creation.

Rudra - One who Roars (with destructive anger) has more to do with Agni (and also the Agni nEtra - Third Eye) than Shankara or Shiva. Do you even care to look at the basic etymological meaning of words before you imagine and comment on these issues? FYI, these days the thesaurus and dictionaries are also available online.
These kinds of etymological explanations for various words  / names, without any supportive backing for that meaning from the authentic literature  (e.g. Shruti), is not acceptable. Such random explanation, without proper backing from sruti,  may be okay for Wiki or any other online discussion, but not for serious debates. Note, someone could break down "rudra" etymologically as "r + udra"  (meaning, having a stomach or big stomach), but should anyone take that seriously? Of course, not. Same thing applies in the above about Rudra as 'one who roars (with destructive anger)'
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by TruthSeeker on Wed Jun 28, 2017 11:54 pm

Religions are "man" made, not "woman" made.

God has "nothing" to do with ANY religion.

Allah has NO RELATION to Islam, Jesus has NO RELATION to Christianity.

They "TRIED" to teach about God.

Their followers turned that into a Religion, and started doing a lot of things in the name of religion.......the saddest part, forgetting all about God.

Jesus did NOT talk about Christianity, his followers did.

Mohammad did NOT talk about Islam, his followers did.

Krishna never even mentioned the word HINDUISM.

Go figure, and lets take our swords out?

Ha,
TS.

TruthSeeker

Posts : 1249
Join date : 2012-08-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by smArtha on Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:18 pm

Seva Lamberdar wrote:

These kinds of etymological explanations for various words  / names, without any supportive backing for that meaning from the authentic literature  (e.g. Shruti), is not acceptable. Such random explanation, without proper backing from sruti,  may be okay for Wiki or any other online discussion, but not for serious debates. Note, someone could break down "rudra" etymologically as "r + udra"  (meaning, having a stomach or big stomach), but should anyone take that seriously? Of course, not. Same thing applies in the above about Rudra as 'one who roars (with destructive anger)'

r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is a Sruti backed interpretation and rudra as one who roars with anger is not Sruti backed? By Sruti, I hope you are not referring to an ex of yours :-D

smArtha

Posts : 1197
Join date : 2013-07-29

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:57 pm

smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:

These kinds of etymological explanations for various words  / names, without any supportive backing for that meaning from the authentic literature  (e.g. Shruti), is not acceptable. Such random explanation, without proper backing from sruti,  may be okay for Wiki or any other online discussion, but not for serious debates. Note, someone could break down "rudra" etymologically as "r + udra"  (meaning, having a stomach or big stomach), but should anyone take that seriously? Of course, not. Same thing applies in the above about Rudra as 'one who roars (with destructive anger)'

r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is a Sruti backed interpretation and rudra as one who roars with anger is not Sruti backed? By Sruti, I hope you are not referring to an ex of yours :-D
No, r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is NOT a Sruti backed interpretation. Btw, the main potency of Rudra in terms of destructive power is evident in the opening section of the Rig Veda (Book 1: Hymn 114, Verses 7-10). Moreover, the Gita (Ch. 10 - V. 23) talks about "Rudranam Shankrashchasmi .. " ("'I' am also Shankra among the Rudras .."). 

Incidentally, all these names (Agni, Rudra, Varuna, Vayu et al.) in the Vedas are meant to qualify one Brahman (in Saguna mode) according to specific attributes (sometimes in terms of natural forces / potencies) associated with those names (e.g. with Agni, Rudra, Varuna and Vayu et al.). The use of a different / separate name (e.g. Vayu, Rudra) is merely for the purpose of identifying one God (Brahman) having a certain potency or mode (attribute) associated with that name (e.g. fire with Agni, water with Varuna, and so on). Here is more on this topic,
"BRAHMAN (God) in Hinduism" ---  http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/brahman.html
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Wed Jul 05, 2017 10:44 am

Seva Lamberdar wrote:
smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:

These kinds of etymological explanations for various words  / names, without any supportive backing for that meaning from the authentic literature  (e.g. Shruti), is not acceptable. Such random explanation, without proper backing from sruti,  may be okay for Wiki or any other online discussion, but not for serious debates. Note, someone could break down "rudra" etymologically as "r + udra"  (meaning, having a stomach or big stomach), but should anyone take that seriously? Of course, not. Same thing applies in the above about Rudra as 'one who roars (with destructive anger)'

r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is a Sruti backed interpretation and rudra as one who roars with anger is not Sruti backed? By Sruti, I hope you are not referring to an ex of yours :-D
No, r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is NOT a Sruti backed interpretation. Btw, the main potency of Rudra in terms of destructive power is evident in the opening section of the Rig Veda (Book 1: Hymn 114, Verses 7-10). Moreover, the Gita (Ch. 10 - V. 23) talks about "Rudranam Shankrashchasmi .. " ("'I' am also Shankra among the Rudras .."). 

Incidentally, all these names (Agni, Rudra, Varuna, Vayu et al.) in the Vedas are meant to qualify one Brahman (in Saguna mode) according to specific attributes (sometimes in terms of natural forces / potencies) associated with those names (e.g. with Agni, Rudra, Varuna and Vayu et al.). The use of a different / separate name (e.g. Vayu, Rudra) is merely for the purpose of identifying one God (Brahman) having a certain potency or mode (attribute) associated with that name (e.g. fire with Agni, water with Varuna, and so on). Here is more on this topic,
"BRAHMAN (God) in Hinduism" ---  http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/brahman.html
Incidentally, it's the same type of confusion that persists with respect to the hymn about Sudra in Purusa Sukta (Rig Veda: Book 10 -- hymn 90.12), where the Sanskrit component "... padbhyāṃ śūdro ajāyata" is misinterpreted as 'Sudra came / appeared from feet (of Purusa)" instead of correctly interpreted as "Sudra arrived (in society / tribe, from outside) on feet (by walking)".
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by smArtha on Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:36 pm

Seva Lamberdar wrote:
smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:

These kinds of etymological explanations for various words  / names, without any supportive backing for that meaning from the authentic literature  (e.g. Shruti), is not acceptable. Such random explanation, without proper backing from sruti,  may be okay for Wiki or any other online discussion, but not for serious debates. Note, someone could break down "rudra" etymologically as "r + udra"  (meaning, having a stomach or big stomach), but should anyone take that seriously? Of course, not. Same thing applies in the above about Rudra as 'one who roars (with destructive anger)'

r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is a Sruti backed interpretation and rudra as one who roars with anger is not Sruti backed? By Sruti, I hope you are not referring to an ex of yours :-D
No, r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is NOT a Sruti backed interpretation. Btw, the main potency of Rudra in terms of destructive power is evident in the opening section of the Rig Veda (Book 1: Hymn 114, Verses 7-10). Moreover, the Gita (Ch. 10 - V. 23) talks about "Rudranam Shankrashchasmi .. " ("'I' am also Shankra among the Rudras .."). 

Incidentally, all these names (Agni, Rudra, Varuna, Vayu et al.) in the Vedas are meant to qualify one Brahman (in Saguna mode) according to specific attributes (sometimes in terms of natural forces / potencies) associated with those names (e.g. with Agni, Rudra, Varuna and Vayu et al.). The use of a different / separate name (e.g. Vayu, Rudra) is merely for the purpose of identifying one God (Brahman) having a certain potency or mode (attribute) associated with that name (e.g. fire with Agni, water with Varuna, and so on). Here is more on this topic,
"BRAHMAN (God) in Hinduism" ---  http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/brahman.html

"Rudranam Shankrashchasmi .. " is to be interpreted as that among the 11 Rudras it is the Mahadeva (or Shankara) that is the Supreme Lord and Krishna is saying He is that very Supreme Lord. If we go by manifestations of Brahman in Saguna forms then you, me and a tiny microbe or a pebble are all His Saguna manifestations. So that cannot be an argument to say Agni is same as Vayu same as Rudra same as Indra etc.

smArtha

Posts : 1197
Join date : 2013-07-29

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Seva Lamberdar on Wed Jul 05, 2017 2:40 pm

smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:
smArtha wrote:
Seva Lamberdar wrote:

These kinds of etymological explanations for various words  / names, without any supportive backing for that meaning from the authentic literature  (e.g. Shruti), is not acceptable. Such random explanation, without proper backing from sruti,  may be okay for Wiki or any other online discussion, but not for serious debates. Note, someone could break down "rudra" etymologically as "r + udra"  (meaning, having a stomach or big stomach), but should anyone take that seriously? Of course, not. Same thing applies in the above about Rudra as 'one who roars (with destructive anger)'

r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is a Sruti backed interpretation and rudra as one who roars with anger is not Sruti backed? By Sruti, I hope you are not referring to an ex of yours :-D
No, r+udra = rudra meaning having stomach is NOT a Sruti backed interpretation. Btw, the main potency of Rudra in terms of destructive power is evident in the opening section of the Rig Veda (Book 1: Hymn 114, Verses 7-10). Moreover, the Gita (Ch. 10 - V. 23) talks about "Rudranam Shankrashchasmi .. " ("'I' am also Shankra among the Rudras .."). 

Incidentally, all these names (Agni, Rudra, Varuna, Vayu et al.) in the Vedas are meant to qualify one Brahman (in Saguna mode) according to specific attributes (sometimes in terms of natural forces / potencies) associated with those names (e.g. with Agni, Rudra, Varuna and Vayu et al.). The use of a different / separate name (e.g. Vayu, Rudra) is merely for the purpose of identifying one God (Brahman) having a certain potency or mode (attribute) associated with that name (e.g. fire with Agni, water with Varuna, and so on). Here is more on this topic,
"BRAHMAN (God) in Hinduism" ---  http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/brahman.html

"Rudranam Shankrashchasmi .. " is to be interpreted as that among the 11 Rudras it is the Mahadeva (or Shankara) that is the Supreme Lord and Krishna is saying He is that very Supreme Lord. If we go by manifestations of Brahman in Saguna forms then you, me and a tiny microbe or a pebble are all His Saguna manifestations. So that cannot be an argument to say Agni is same as Vayu same as Rudra same as Indra etc.
Not quite. All these names / labels (Rudra, Agni, Vayu ..) are merely to help identify (during worship etc.) the Saguna (viz. Ishwara) in terms of specific recognizable attributes (read my blog indicated earlier, http://www.geocities.ws/lamberdar/brahman.html). Moreover, these labels / names  for Saguna / Ishwara, such as Shankra (the fiercest among Rudras), just imply the extension / expansion in the highest mode for a particular attribute of Ishwara (the Gita: Ch. 10 - V. 41) which none of the microbes or humans can equal.
avatar
Seva Lamberdar

Posts : 4782
Join date : 2012-11-29

View user profile https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYp0igbxHcmg1G1J-qw0VUBSn7Fu

Back to top Go down

Re: Why Do We Offer Milk or Honey on Shivalinga?

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum