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Post by goodcitizn Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:28 pm

My Italian neighbor left behind a jar of clarifed butter asking us to use it since she had plenty left over from Thanksgiving. I put it in the fridge a couple of days back. It looks frozen like ghee now. Is it reusable like ghee or does it get rindy if cooked again? TIA.

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Post by Hellsangel Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:32 pm

Aren't clarified butter and ghee one and the same thing?
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Post by goodcitizn Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:36 pm

Hellsangel wrote:Aren't clarified butter and ghee one and the same thing?
Not sure. My grandmother used to make ghee from butter. I vaguely remember her doing it carefully, adding curry leaves for flavor, filtering etc. The whole house used to have a pleasant aroma.

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Post by FluteHolder Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:40 pm

Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee though I have never seen in shops sold as in that name. We still make ghee at home from Organic unsalted butter from wholefoods and the ghee tastes almost same as back home. In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

If what your neighbor gave is ghee, have more dosais with milagaipodi, and ghee Smile

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Post by goodcitizn Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:46 pm

FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee though I have never seen in shops sold as in that name. We still make ghee at home from Organic unsalted butter from wholefoods and the ghee tastes almost same as back home. In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

If what your neighbor gave is ghee, have more dosais with milagaipodi, and ghee Smile
Yes, it was murunga ilai!

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Post by indophile Sun Dec 01, 2013 2:19 pm

FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee........ In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

In our parts we use betel leaves (paan leaves) when melting butter for making ghee, specially the Bangla kind of betel leaves (they are thicker than normal sweet betel leaves, and their aroma is stronger and longer lasting).

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Post by goodcitizn Mon Dec 02, 2013 6:56 am

indophile wrote:
FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee........ In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

In our parts we use betel leaves (paan leaves) when melting butter for making ghee, specially the Bangla kind of betel leaves (they are thicker than normal sweet betel leaves, and their aroma is stronger and longer lasting).
Thanks, Indo. Didn't know betel leaves are also used. Wonder why different leaves are used in the preparation of ghee. Flavor?

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Post by garam_kuta Mon Dec 02, 2013 10:35 am

goodcitizn wrote:
indophile wrote:
FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee........ In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

In our parts we use betel leaves (paan leaves) when melting butter for making ghee, specially the Bangla kind of betel leaves (they are thicker than normal sweet betel leaves, and their aroma is stronger and longer lasting).
Thanks, Indo. Didn't know betel leaves are also used. Wonder why different leaves are used in the preparation of ghee. Flavor?
aama sAmi - murungai or vetrilai or curry leaves give an exquisite aroma and taste (flavor) when you mix it with plain rice and initiate eating 3 or 4 course meals like you do (so blessed maan !) -another alternative is a touch of fenugreek to add at the end when it is still hot. To get it in rava consistency, add a few drops of mOr at the end carefully, drop-wise, as it can spurt violently. Ghee is clarified butter alright and IMO varying degrees of clarified butter can be made and good ghee falls relatively at the high end, before getting burnt and charred. All relatively highly saturated stuff solidify easily at cooler temperatures that includes coconut oil

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Post by indophile Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:32 am

garam_kuta wrote:
goodcitizn wrote:
indophile wrote:
FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee........ In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

In our parts we use betel leaves (paan leaves) when melting butter for making ghee, specially the Bangla kind of betel leaves (they are thicker than normal sweet betel leaves, and their aroma is stronger and longer lasting).
Thanks, Indo. Didn't know betel leaves are also used. Wonder why different leaves are used in the preparation of ghee. Flavor?
aama sAmi - murungai or vetrilai or curry leaves give an exquisite aroma and taste (flavor) when you mix it with plain rice and initiate eating 3 or 4 course meals like you do (so blessed maan !) -another alternative is a touch of fenugreek to add at the end when it is still hot.  To get it in rava consistency, add a few drops of mOr at the end carefully, drop-wise, as it can spurt violently. Ghee is clarified butter alright  and IMO varying degrees of clarified butter can be made and good ghee falls relatively at the high end, before getting burnt and charred. All relatively highly saturated stuff solidify  easily at cooler temperatures that includes coconut oil
They say the solid residue at the bottom is the real good stuff in terms of nutritive value. It's all protein. The liquidy ghee at the top is all fat. So we carefully filter the protein out of the butter and keep the fat. Smile 
As kids we used to mix the residue with a little sugar and enjoy it.

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Post by goodcitizn Mon Dec 02, 2013 6:21 pm

garam_kuta wrote:
goodcitizn wrote:
indophile wrote:
FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee........ In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

In our parts we use betel leaves (paan leaves) when melting butter for making ghee, specially the Bangla kind of betel leaves (they are thicker than normal sweet betel leaves, and their aroma is stronger and longer lasting).
Thanks, Indo. Didn't know betel leaves are also used. Wonder why different leaves are used in the preparation of ghee. Flavor?
aama sAmi - murungai or vetrilai or curry leaves give an exquisite aroma and taste (flavor) when you mix it with plain rice and initiate eating 3 or 4 course meals like you do (so blessed maan !) -another alternative is a touch of fenugreek to add at the end when it is still hot.  To get it in rava consistency, add a few drops of mOr at the end carefully, drop-wise, as it can spurt violently. Ghee is clarified butter alright  and IMO varying degrees of clarified butter can be made and good ghee falls relatively at the high end, before getting burnt and charred. All relatively highly saturated stuff solidify  easily at cooler temperatures that includes coconut oil
Hot dog: You seem to know a lot about ghee. Impressed!

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Post by goodcitizn Mon Dec 02, 2013 6:25 pm

indophile wrote:
garam_kuta wrote:
goodcitizn wrote:
indophile wrote:
FluteHolder wrote:Yes. Clarified butter means Ghee........ In India, we use 'drumstick' leaves while making ghee, here we use fresh curry leaves.

In our parts we use betel leaves (paan leaves) when melting butter for making ghee, specially the Bangla kind of betel leaves (they are thicker than normal sweet betel leaves, and their aroma is stronger and longer lasting).
Thanks, Indo. Didn't know betel leaves are also used. Wonder why different leaves are used in the preparation of ghee. Flavor?
aama sAmi - murungai or vetrilai or curry leaves give an exquisite aroma and taste (flavor) when you mix it with plain rice and initiate eating 3 or 4 course meals like you do (so blessed maan !) -another alternative is a touch of fenugreek to add at the end when it is still hot.  To get it in rava consistency, add a few drops of mOr at the end carefully, drop-wise, as it can spurt violently. Ghee is clarified butter alright  and IMO varying degrees of clarified butter can be made and good ghee falls relatively at the high end, before getting burnt and charred. All relatively highly saturated stuff solidify  easily at cooler temperatures that includes coconut oil
They say the solid residue at the bottom is the real good stuff in terms of nutritive value. It's all protein. The liquidy ghee at the top is all fat. So we carefully filter the protein out of the butter and keep the fat. Smile 
As kids we used to mix the residue with a little sugar and enjoy it.
Indo: The sediment you mentioned is called Kasandu in Tamil and, yes, our grandmother used to mix it with sugar and give us. Tasted quite yummy.

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