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The only place that really smells of mangoes is India

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The only place that really smells of mangoes is India Empty The only place that really smells of mangoes is India

Post by Guest Wed Feb 22, 2012 2:32 pm

So irrational is my possessiveness about the mango that even when I see the mango fruit motif in fabrics, I expect it to be regarded as an Indian pattern. It annoys me to hear it referred to as ‘paisley’ and I am incredulous when people describe it as a traditional English motif or when such dodgy Italian fashion houses as Etro try and make it their trademark. The English can create roast beef motifs for all I care and the Italians can paint pizzas on their ties. But the mango is Indian and should be acknowledged as such.

Even if my possessiveness has a slightly lunatic edge to its extremism, the reality is that the mango is not only Indian, it is as old as India itself. The virtues of the mango were noted in the Bradaranyaka Upanishad in 1000 BC (i.e. a full millennium before anyone had heard of Jesus Christ or Western civilisation itself) and some authorities will argue that the reference to Saha in the Rig Veda is a reference to the mango. These mentions in ancient literature reflect the respect Hindus have for the mango. It is a transformation of Prajapati, the creator of all creatures and its flowers symbolize the darts of Kamdev, the god of love and sex.

Even Buddhists respect the mango’s sacred origins. The Buddha would rest in a mango grove. And according to one story, the Buddha once ate a mango, planted the stone and then washed his hands over it. “A beautiful white mango tree sprang forth bearing flowers and fruit.” (The quote is from K.T. Achaya, who was almost as possessive about the mango as I am.)

Nobody seriously disputes that the mango is of Indian origin. Some people say that it was first cultivated in the sub-continent around 2000 BC and then spread from our shores to the rest of Asia. Contrary to what you and I may think, the mango is not a north Indian tree. It originated in the north-east, probably around Mizoram. Despite its religious significance, it soon became the ultimate Indian fruit appealing to people of all religions. When the Mughals first came to India, they complained bitterly about the poor quality of our fruit (“What? No Samarkand melons!” etc. etc.). But they soon realised that the mango was superior to many of the fruits they were used to. Emperors took to planting orchards and in the 16th century, Akbar planted one lakh mango trees at Darbhanga in Bihar and called the orchard Lakh Bagh.

By the time the Europeans got here, the mango had already spread to the Middle-East (and to Egypt, where, no doubt, it grew quietly, awaiting the arrival of Jean Claude Ellena) but was still largely unknown in the West. The Portuguese took it to Africa and then to Brazil. By the 18th century it had reached the West Indies and a few decades later, it turned up in the US. It is still cultivated in Florida and Hawaii and enjoyed by thousands of Americans who are entirely unaware of its Indian origins.

http://virsanghvi.com/vir-world-ArticleDetail.aspx?ID=632

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The only place that really smells of mangoes is India Empty Re: The only place that really smells of mangoes is India

Post by Guest Wed Feb 22, 2012 2:52 pm

Rashu, you need to book India trip.

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Post by Guest Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:04 am

Tracy Whitney wrote:Rashu, you need to book India trip.

"Even if my possessiveness has a slightly lunatic edge to its extremism" - cmon, no way, RashmunnaBhai Vir Sanghvi Smile

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Post by Kris Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:15 am

Rashmun wrote:So irrational is my possessiveness about the mango that even when I see the mango fruit motif in fabrics, I expect it to be regarded as an Indian pattern. It annoys me to hear it referred to as ‘paisley’ and I am incredulous when people describe it as a traditional English motif or when such dodgy Italian fashion houses as Etro try and make it their trademark. The English can create roast beef motifs for all I care and the Italians can paint pizzas on their ties. But the mango is Indian and should be acknowledged as such.

Even if my possessiveness has a slightly lunatic edge to its extremism, the reality is that the mango is not only Indian, it is as old as India itself. The virtues of the mango were noted in the Bradaranyaka Upanishad in 1000 BC (i.e. a full millennium before anyone had heard of Jesus Christ or Western civilisation itself) and some authorities will argue that the reference to Saha in the Rig Veda is a reference to the mango. These mentions in ancient literature reflect the respect Hindus have for the mango. It is a transformation of Prajapati, the creator of all creatures and its flowers symbolize the darts of Kamdev, the god of love and sex.

Even Buddhists respect the mango’s sacred origins. The Buddha would rest in a mango grove. And according to one story, the Buddha once ate a mango, planted the stone and then washed his hands over it. “A beautiful white mango tree sprang forth bearing flowers and fruit.” (The quote is from K.T. Achaya, who was almost as possessive about the mango as I am.)

Nobody seriously disputes that the mango is of Indian origin. Some people say that it was first cultivated in the sub-continent around 2000 BC and then spread from our shores to the rest of Asia. Contrary to what you and I may think, the mango is not a north Indian tree. It originated in the north-east, probably around Mizoram. Despite its religious significance, it soon became the ultimate Indian fruit appealing to people of all religions. When the Mughals first came to India, they complained bitterly about the poor quality of our fruit (“What? No Samarkand melons!” etc. etc.). But they soon realised that the mango was superior to many of the fruits they were used to. Emperors took to planting orchards and in the 16th century, Akbar planted one lakh mango trees at Darbhanga in Bihar and called the orchard Lakh Bagh.

By the time the Europeans got here, the mango had already spread to the Middle-East (and to Egypt, where, no doubt, it grew quietly, awaiting the arrival of Jean Claude Ellena) but was still largely unknown in the West. The Portuguese took it to Africa and then to Brazil. By the 18th century it had reached the West Indies and a few decades later, it turned up in the US. It is still cultivated in Florida and Hawaii and enjoyed by thousands of Americans who are entirely unaware of its Indian origins.

http://virsanghvi.com/vir-world-ArticleDetail.aspx?ID=632


>>>> Speaking of mangoes, you guys must be coming up on the season in a month or so. Damn! I somehow don't have the urge to get the ripe ones at the indian stores here. Used to love the unripe ones off the trees with a combo of salt and chilly powder

Kris

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Post by Guest Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:23 am

Remind me to take a few pics & post 'em on the food thread...Smile

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Post by Guest Thu Feb 23, 2012 7:49 am

Richard Hed wrote:
Tracy Whitney wrote:Rashu, you need to book India trip.

"Even if my possessiveness has a slightly lunatic edge to its extremism" - cmon, no way, RashmunnaBhai Vir Sanghvi Smile

Well he kept posting about the foods and fruits of India all day. Thot he needs a visit.

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Post by Guest Thu Feb 23, 2012 11:56 am

Kris wrote:
Rashmun wrote:So irrational is my possessiveness about the mango that even when I see the mango fruit motif in fabrics, I expect it to be regarded as an Indian pattern. It annoys me to hear it referred to as ‘paisley’ and I am incredulous when people describe it as a traditional English motif or when such dodgy Italian fashion houses as Etro try and make it their trademark. The English can create roast beef motifs for all I care and the Italians can paint pizzas on their ties. But the mango is Indian and should be acknowledged as such.

Even if my possessiveness has a slightly lunatic edge to its extremism, the reality is that the mango is not only Indian, it is as old as India itself. The virtues of the mango were noted in the Bradaranyaka Upanishad in 1000 BC (i.e. a full millennium before anyone had heard of Jesus Christ or Western civilisation itself) and some authorities will argue that the reference to Saha in the Rig Veda is a reference to the mango. These mentions in ancient literature reflect the respect Hindus have for the mango. It is a transformation of Prajapati, the creator of all creatures and its flowers symbolize the darts of Kamdev, the god of love and sex.

Even Buddhists respect the mango’s sacred origins. The Buddha would rest in a mango grove. And according to one story, the Buddha once ate a mango, planted the stone and then washed his hands over it. “A beautiful white mango tree sprang forth bearing flowers and fruit.” (The quote is from K.T. Achaya, who was almost as possessive about the mango as I am.)

Nobody seriously disputes that the mango is of Indian origin. Some people say that it was first cultivated in the sub-continent around 2000 BC and then spread from our shores to the rest of Asia. Contrary to what you and I may think, the mango is not a north Indian tree. It originated in the north-east, probably around Mizoram. Despite its religious significance, it soon became the ultimate Indian fruit appealing to people of all religions. When the Mughals first came to India, they complained bitterly about the poor quality of our fruit (“What? No Samarkand melons!” etc. etc.). But they soon realised that the mango was superior to many of the fruits they were used to. Emperors took to planting orchards and in the 16th century, Akbar planted one lakh mango trees at Darbhanga in Bihar and called the orchard Lakh Bagh.

By the time the Europeans got here, the mango had already spread to the Middle-East (and to Egypt, where, no doubt, it grew quietly, awaiting the arrival of Jean Claude Ellena) but was still largely unknown in the West. The Portuguese took it to Africa and then to Brazil. By the 18th century it had reached the West Indies and a few decades later, it turned up in the US. It is still cultivated in Florida and Hawaii and enjoyed by thousands of Americans who are entirely unaware of its Indian origins.

http://virsanghvi.com/vir-world-ArticleDetail.aspx?ID=632


>>>> Speaking of mangoes, you guys must be coming up on the season in a month or so. Damn! I somehow don't have the urge to get the ripe ones at the indian stores here. Used to love the unripe ones off the trees with a combo of salt and chilly powder

in U.P., the mango season is typically may-july though it may start sometime in april and end sometime in early or mid august. the best mangoes are available in june and july.

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Post by chameli Thu Feb 23, 2012 1:09 pm

rashmun ,

unless i am mistaken the mango was introduced to India by the portugese / brazilians

do check it

but the variety of mangoes available in india is terrific .

each state will claim their mango is the best

but the Alphonso mango ( haapus ) ( again imported form portugal/brazil ) is the sweetest by far
chameli
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